Tagged: poll

JapanSoc Poll – 4 Socs to Hit Front Page?

In February, I asked whether 3 socs should be needed for an article on JapanSoc to be promoted from the “Upcoming” page to the “Top Stories” page. At that time, articles were averaging 2.9 votes each and users voted in favor of the 3-soc requirement.

As JapanSoc continues to grow, the average number of socs per article has risen to 4.6. So, the question is, should 4 socs be needed to hit the front page?

The case for a 4 soc promotion requirement

  • Four votes would make sure higher quality articles make the front page.
  • With fewer articles getting promoted, existing front page articles can get more exposure.
  • Currently, almost everything gets on the front page, which defeats the purpose of “Top” stories.

The case against a 4 soc promotion requirement

  • Breaking news stories might not be so new by the time they hit the front page.
  • Submissions might disappear down the Upcoming page before enough people see them.
  • Special interest topics might not get the exposure they deserve, e.g. ESL or anime.
  • Users might be discouraged from submitting articles if it is harder to make the front page.

I should point out that a submission must get enough socs within 7 days to be promoted to the font page.

Time to vote… Update: Voting has now closed. 4 socs it is!

[poll id="8"]

JapanSoc Poll – 3 Socs to Hit Front Page?

JapanSoc continues to grow. There have been 398 Japan-related articles submitted to the site since it started last November. On those articles, there have been 348 comments and 1159 votes. That means that each article has been soc’ed an average 2.9 times.

Hitting the JapanSoc front page

Currently, when an article is submitted to JapanSoc, it goes in the “Upcoming” queue. Two votes are needed for it to hit the front page and be added to the main rss feed. One vote is automatically given by the submitter, so only one other vote is necessary. With 67 registered users as I write this, almost everything is getting a second vote and making it off the queue.

The case for a 3 soc promotion requirement

  • Three votes would make sure only the best articles make it to the front page.
  • With fewer articles getting promoted, existing front page articles can get more exposure.
  • Users might promote JapanSoc more, encouraging people to soc their submissions.

The case against a 3 soc promotion requirement

  • Submissions might disappear down the Upcoming page before enough people see them.
  • Special interest topics might not get the exposure they deserve.
  • Users might be discouraged from submitting articles if it is harder to make the front page.

Time to vote… Voting has ended, and the “3 Soc Rule” is now in effect.

[poll id="4"]

Japan Exposed Through Opinion Poll Translations

What Japan ThinksForeign perception of Japan is often tarnished by sweeping generalizations made by people who lack the language skills and tools necessary to understand the real thoughts and actions of Japan’s general public.

What Japan Thinks

Introducing Ken Y-N, a legend among Japan bloggers and the face behind What Japan Thinks, a blog full of English translations of Japanese opinion polls and surveys. A keen statistician and Japan enthusiast, Ken has amassed nearly one and half thousand subscribers while shining some light on Japan’s bad office habits and why Japanese women love American men.

Helping the Japan bloggers’ community

His new found fame has brought him some publicity in the form of an interview with the Japan Times, and now he’s sharing his fortune with the rest of us by hosting crowd-pullers like the Japan Blog Awards and using his web skills to promote the JapanSoc social bookmarking site with the JapanSoc FeedBurner FeedFlare.

There’s more to Ken than charts and graphs

One last interesting tidbit about Ken is his other websites. First, do you remember that immensely popular Japanese website that would tell you what you were thinking? Well, Ken jumped on the opportunity to make an English version and the result, BrainScannr, tells me that I’m thinking happy thoughts, which makes it almost as accurate as Kazuko Hosoki! Next, If you’ve ever wondered what your name would be if you were a Buddhist, Ken has the answer. His site, My Buddhist Name, will do the English to Buddhist conversion for you! However, I’m not so sure it’s all that accurate since my Buddhist name turns out to be The Girl Lion Always Youth! :shock: